Monday, August 31, 2009

GOPUSA ILLINOIS Daily Clips - August 31, 2009

GOPUSA ILLINOIS
-- Political parties exist to elect candidates who can and will defend/advance their platforms. Generally, those who become U.S. Senators are Congressmen, State Senators, and State Representatives. QUESTION: Why aren't any Illinois Republican Congressmen, Senators, or Representatives who support all the planks in the Illinois Republican Party (IRP) platform running against Mark Kirk? ANSWER: Tragically and outrageously, very few Illinois Republican Congressmen, Senators, and Representatives support all the planks in the IRP platform, and, the Democrats and RINOs who dominate the IRP have made it clear that the more planks in the IRP platform that a candidate supports, the harder that they work against that candidate. - Dave Diersen
http://www.gopillinois.com

ABC7

-- Sen. John McCain stumps for Rep. Mark Kirk - Sarah Schulte
http://abclocal.go.com/wls/story?section=news/politics&id=6990493

DAILY HERALD

-- McCain endorses Kirk in bid for Burris' senate seat - Steve Zalusky (ONE OF THE COMMENTS POSTED ON THE ARTICLE: The Illinois GOP still doesn't get it do they? Just whose vote are they trying to capture with an endorsement by the RINO McCain for the RINO Kirk? Do they realize McCain only got 36.9% of the vote in Illinois against a community organizer socialist? Kirk has proven his contempt for conservatism with his support of Cap and Trade, abortion, gun control, higher CAFE standards, prohibiting ANWR oil development, amnesty for illegals, and more. Perhaps the GOP here hopes to capture a few Democrats who just can't make up their minds which liberal they want the most.) (DIERSEN QUESTION: Crossover voting is a terrible problem. What percentage of those who voted for McCain in the 2008 primary election voted for Obama in the 2008 general election?)
http://www.dailyherald.com/story/?id=317669
-- GOP targets Foster on health care - Joseph Ryan
http://www.dailyherald.com/story/?id=317628
-- Is Bush lurking in Obamaland? - Rueben Navarrette (FROM THE COMMENTARY: How's that for "change we can believe in"? So what gives? Here are three options: Either Obama is learning that being president is much more difficult than running for president, or he's a bigger pragmatist than we thought, or he never really believed President Bush was as bad he made him out to be during the campaign. And whatever brought them to this point, Obama supporters only have two options: Stand by their man, or their principles.) (DIERSEN: When Bush ran in 2000, he ran as someone who would defend/advance the Republican Party platform. But after he was elected, outrageously, he made it clear that he rejected many important planks in the Republican Party platform. Because of that, the Republican Party lost control of the U.S. House, the U.S. Senate, and the Executive Branch.)
http://www.dailyherald.com/story/?id=317334
-- Should have asked us what we thought - Katherine Anne Hedlund, Buffalo Grove
http://www.dailyherald.com/story/?id=316790&src=

CHICAGO SUN-TIMES

-- Obama’s health care tactics just like those he used in state Senate in 2004 Accusing critics of 'fear-mongering' was tactic he used in state Senate days - Lynn Sweet and Dave McKinney
http://www.suntimes.com/news/sweet/1744034,CST-NWS-sweet31.article
-- Rep. Peter Roskam and Obama on health care, a replay from 2004 Illinois senate debate - Lynn Sweet
http://blogs.suntimes.com/sweet/2009/08/rep_peter_roskam_and_obama_on.html
-- DIERSEN HEADLINE: Esther J. Cepeda wants candidates in Illinois to promote their race and national origin. According to page 486 of the 2010 Ammanac of American Politics, 65.3% of Illinois residents are White, 14.6% are Black, 14.6% are Hispanic, and 4.1% are Asian. 16.7% of Illinois residents are of German national origin, 10.4% Irish, and 6.3% Polish. http://www.suntimes.com/lifestyles/1743767,CST-EDT-esther31.article
-- State contractors hire Madigan's law firm Illinois House speaker: no laws broken, no conflict of interest - Chris Fusco and Tim Novak (FROM THE ARTICLE: The law firm of House Speaker Michael Madigan, who is also chairman of the Illinois Democratic Party, won a property tax break for Andrew McKenna Sr., whose son Andy McKenna was chairman of the Illinois Republican Party at the time. Two years ago, the elder McKenna hired the Madigan & Getzendanner law firm to fight a 70 percent increase in the assessed value on his $4 million mansion in Winnetka. Madigan's firm got Cook County Assessor James Houlihan to scale back the increase to 60 percent. That saved McKenna $4,898 in property taxes.)
http://www.suntimes.com/news/watchdogs/1743915,CST-NWS-watchdogs31.article

MT. CARMEL REGISTER

-- Budget trouble ‘the norm’ -- Cost-paring everywhere, senator Righter says - Phil Gower
http://www.tristate-media.com/articles/2009/08/31/mtcarmelregister/news/news1.txt

NBC5

-- Cross Squashes Tax Hike House GOP leader said to have personally killed income tax hike - Steve Rhodes
http://www.nbcchicago.com/news/politics/Cross-Checked-56336272.html
-- Trusting Quinn -- A lesson for the University of Illinois community - Steve Rhodes
http://www.nbcchicago.com/news/politics/Trusting-Quinn-56330532.html

SPRINGFIELD STATE JOURNAL REGISTER

-- TRAGIC: Support lacking in Springfield for video poker ban - Deana Poole (DIERSEN: QUESTIONS: Tragically, what does that say about those who represent Springfield voters? Tragically, what does that say about those who elected them? ANSWER: They reject the prosperity and safety that Republican principles bring. They want the poverty and crime that Democrat/RINO principles bring.)
http://www.sj-r.com/homepage/x1566715248/Video-gambling-to-get-green-light-in-Springfield
(FROM THE ARTICLE: Gov. Pat Quinn used his amendatory veto power last week to make it easier for voters t to block video gaming in individual communities. In an Aug. 25 veto message for Senate Bill 1595 - a bill mainly designed to make sure that off-track betting parlors are not too close to schools — Quinn added a change in another part of gaming law. Current law allows a municipality or county to ban video gaming by referendum, but to get the question on a ballot, at least 25 percent of “the legal voters” of that municipality or county must sign petitions. Under Quinn’s proposed change, townships are added to municipalities and counties among units of government that can prohibit gambling. Quinn also wants a lesser signature requirement. The required number would be 11 percent of votes cast in the last regular election conducted in that unit of government. In his veto message, Quinn wrote that, “it is important that we allow local communities the opportunity to define the gaming that occurs within their communities. . .When it comes to important decisions facing our communities, each person deserves to have his or her voice heard. That is why I propose that a referendum held under the Video Gaming Act be subject to the same requirements imposed on other referenda under the Election Code.” For the change to take effect, the Senate and House both must approve it by majority vote. A two-thirds vote of each house to override the changes also could enact the underlying bill without the governor’s changes.)
-- DIERSEN HEADLINE: Needless-to-say, I do not agree with everything in Martin's comment on the Schoenburg article, but I give Martin credit for not hiding behind some phony name.
http://www.sj-r.com/opinions/x1886192877/Bernard-Schoenburg-GOP-far-from-settled-on-Senate-nod

SOUTHTOWN STAR

-- How far will Hynes go in bid for governor? - Rich Miller (FROM THE COMMENTARY: As any loyal party member should do, Hynes ought to think long and hard about how far he can go before he damages his own side, no matter the outcome. The last two Republican gubernatorial primaries were so nasty and divisive that they contributed significantly to their party's general election losses. And the last time an incumbent Democratic governor lost a primary, in 1976, the Republicans won the governor's mansion and held on to power for 26 years. On balance, though, I think Quinn probably needs this primary race. It'll give us all a chance to see what he's really made of.)http://www.southtownstar.com/news/miller/1743756,083109miller.article

NAPERVILLE SUN

-- Let the games begin. . .or not? - Kathy Cichon (FROM THE ARTICLE: As of last Wednesday, the city had received about 100 comments. Wanna bet which way residents are leaning? "The vast majority is in opposition," said Dan Di Santo, assistant to the city manager. "At this stage, it's probably around 85 percent.)http://www.suburbanchicagonews.com/napervillesun/news/napertalk/1744006,6_4_NA31_PAGE2COL_S1-090831.article

BEACON NEWS

-- Aurora seeks resident views on best use of community development block grant funds - Andre Salles (DIERSEN: Democrats constantly argue that Republicans are "rich" and that Democrats are "poor." Given that, of course, Democrats want community development block grant funds [funds which overwhelmingly come from Republicans] to be spent on Democrats.) http://www.suburbanchicagonews.com/beaconnews/news/1743924,2_1_AU31_SURVEY_S1-090831.article
(FROM THE ARTICLE: HUD has specific guidelines for block grant funds: 70 percent of the city's grant must go to benefit low- and moderate-income people, and every expense must either alleviate slum or blight conditions or meet other urgent community needs. Hence, the survey, which is designed to find out which areas of the city need which services. The survey breaks down data into the city's six ZIP codes and asks respondents to rate their neighborhoods in a number of categories, including "places to bike" and "places that are safe after dark." It then asks which projects and services the neighborhoods need more of, including those to replace or repair blighted buildings, or encourage small business developments, or bring in more senior centers and youth centers. The data is broken down by race and ethnicity which, under HUD standards, are different categories. That's why one of the questions asks respondents to describe themselves or their household as "Hispanic or Latino" or "Not Hispanic or Latino." Neighborhood Redevelopment Director Michael Kamon said data collected for HUD (and for federal census data) must be separated this way.)
-- OUTSTANDING: Alternative to Planned Parenthood moves in Waterleaf Center will strive to counsel, assist pregnant women - David Garbe

http://www.suburbanchicagonews.com/beaconnews/news/1743997,2_1_AU31_WATERLEAF_S1-090831.article

ALTON TELEGRAPH

-- Dillard seeks GOP nod for governor - Steve Whitworth
http://www.thetelegraph.com/news/area-30653-dillard-illinois.html

THE SOUTHERN

-- Study: More than half of children will engage in sexual behavior before 13 - Bonnie Miller Rubin (DIERSEN: This tragic fact is a direct result of liberalism. Liberalism is what the Democrat Party platform promotes. People who vote for Democrats promote liberalism and therefore promote promiscuity, sexually transmitted diseases, out-of-wedlock births, and abortion. How many sexually transmitted diseases does your son/daughter have? How many girls has your son gotten pregnant? How many out-of-wedlock births has your daughter had? How many abortions has your daughter had?)http://www.thesouthern.com/articles/2009/08/31/breaking_news/doc4a9b35a8074d3159758852.txt

CHAMPION NEWS

-- Mark Kirk attempts to con a group of conservatives - Doug Ibendahl
http://www.championnews.net/article.php?sid=2061
(FROM THE ARTICLE: Something else happened on Sunday that hasn't been reported. Prior to the event with McCain, Kirk held a private meeting with about 30 conservatives from the area. These were reportedly folks who had concerns about Kirk's liberal voting record. Sources tell Champion News that Kirk tried to keep the focus on areas where he differed from the Democrats. And as we've all seen before, he tried to gloss-over his many bad votes. Republicans need to be aware of the lengths this guy will go to secure the Republican nomination. Mark Kirk apparently tried to bamboozle the assembled on several fronts - but here's just one example. We're told that Kirk attempted to satisfy the pro-lifers in attendance by saying he would just have to agree to disagree with them on most of their concerns. But he wanted everyone to know that he - unlike the Democrats - opposes the use of tax money to fund abortions. But here's the problem. It's just not true. Actions speak louder than words. Just last month Kirk voted to keep taxpayer money flowing to abortion provider Planned Parenthood. Kirk has also voted to allow U.S. aid money to be used to fund abortions oversees. Kirk has even voted to allow federal tax dollars to be used to fund human embryonic stem cell research. So clearly Kirk wasn't being honest in that private meeting on Sunday. Keep in mind folks, Mark Kirk is the only Republican in either the House or Senate to receive a 100% rating from Planned Parenthood in 2006 and 2008. Anyone familiar with Planned Parenthood knows they don't give you a 100% rating unless you kowtow to their far-left, radical agenda whenever they order. That's precisely what Kirk's done his entire career. Champion News has put a lot of time into researching and making this resource available: Kick Mark Kirk to the Curb. There you'll see a summary of every major bad vote Kirk has cast during his career in Congress. You'll also find other helpful links. You might consider printing the summary and keeping it on your refrigerator during this Primary campaign season. The Republican base has got to decide pretty soon whether it's serious about nominating a true Republican in February. As McCain's visit here this weekend proves - Mark Kirk's team is very serious about its effort. If conservatives are going to give Kirk a pass on the big issues just because he has an "R" by his name, then he's going to easily win the Primary. If the Primary were held today - Kirk would win by a huge margin. Let's not kid ourselves. Hopefully a challenger will emerge with the spine and courage to really take Kirk on. I realize there are challengers on the field right now but all of them need to step things up. Kirk can be beaten in the Primary but it's going to take a lot more people getting off the sidelines. The candidates aren't the only ones who need to step things up.)
-- The limits of the "TEA Party" - it's not a political party - John Biver

http://www.championnews.net/article.php?sid=2062

ILLINOIS REVIEW

-- Illinois Review asks the gubernatorial candidates "How would you fix the budget?"
http://illinoisreview.typepad.com/illinoisreview/2009/08/illinois-review-asks-how-would-you-fix-the-budget.html
-- Lang blames Cross for "personally killing" income tax increase - Cal Skinner
http://illinoisreview.typepad.com/illinoisreview/2009/08/tom-cross-intimidated-12-brave-souls-in-income-tax-fight.html
-- Dillard blasts Quinn for inept leadership as unemployment rises
http://illinoisreview.typepad.com/illinoisreview/2009/08/dillard-blasts-quinn-for-inept-leadership-as-unemployment-rises.html
-- VIDEO CLIP: David McAloon talks to the MC Freedom Coalition
http://illinoisreview.typepad.com/illinoisreview/2009/08/david-mcaloon-talks-to-the-mc-freedom-coalition.html

TOM ROESER

-- Comparing Fawell to Rove. The Hispanic Lag.
http://www.tomroeser.com/blogview.asp?blogID=25045

CHICAGO ARGUS

-- Will anyone care what McCain thinks? - Gregory Tejeda
http://chicagoargus.blogspot.com/2009/08/will-anyone-care-what-mccain-thinks.html

HUFFINGTON POST

-- DIERSEN HEADLINE: Not surprisingly, anti-American Joshua Hoyt wants Mark Kirk to want American taxpayers to "provide federally-subsidized health care to illegal aliens." http://www.huffingtonpost.com/joshua-hoyt/congressman-kirks-immigra_b_272713.html
(FROM THE ARTICLE: At last week's heavily attended town hall meeting on health care reform in Arlington Heights Congressman Mark Kirk continued to propagate what Newsweek just called one of "The Five Biggest Lies in the Health Care Debate:" that proposed reforms will provide health insurance to illegal immigrants. Kirk questioned even the notion that reform is necessary, claiming that few of the estimated 50 million uninsured in the U.S. are needy U.S. citizens. He then thundered to the applauding crowd, "Should we provide taxpayer health care for people who are illegally here in the U. S.? I do not think we should provide federally-subsidized health care to illegal aliens." No matter that the House version of reform explicitly excludes "individuals who are not lawfully present in the United States." Outright anti-immigrant demagoguery reminiscent of the failed campaigns of Republican perennial candidate Jim Oberweis is surprising, perhaps even shocking, from Congressman Kirk. Kirk has carefully crafted a national image for himself as a thoughtful moderate on issues ranging from the environment to ethics to a women's right to choose. But it turns out that Kirk has an intemperate mean streak when it comes to those immigrant groups he believes he can bully. This racial blind spot may well cost Congressman Kirk the U.S. Senate seat which Barack Obama once held and that he hopes to steal from the Democrats in 2010. Arabs and Mexicans have been Kirk's favorite targets.)

CHICAGO GOP

-- Is There Any Doubt Ultra-liberal Rich Miller is a Democratic Hack? - Tom Swiss
http://www.chicagogop.com/blog/1525-Is-there-any-doubt-Rich-Miller-is-a-Democratic-Hack.html

POLITICO

-- New GOP tactic: The counter-town hall - Michael Falcone
http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0809/26491.html
(FROM THE ARTICLE: Adam Kinzinger, a Republican who’s running against freshman Democratic Rep. Deborah Halvorson in Illinois, held five town halls to highlight his criticism of the congresswoman’s avoidance of public health care meetings during the August recess. Halvorson’s approach has been to schedule telephone town halls - events that are akin to a telephone conference call - and to place a health care reform survey on her congressional website. “I just decided that if she’s not going to throw the town hall meetings, then we’ll do it,” Kinzinger told POLITICO, claiming that each of his events drew a crowd of hundreds. “By the time this is said and done, my campaign will have provided close to 1,500 people the opportunity to speak out on health care.” )
-- Experts see double-digit Democrat losses - Josh Kraushaar

http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0809/26393.html

AMERICAN THINKER

-- A case study in big governent; Illinois - Rick Moran
http://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2009/08/a_case_study_in_big_governent.html

FOX NEWS

-- Publisher Accuses Reid of 'Bullying' Nevada Newspaper The publisher of the Las Vegas Review-Journal says Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid told his advertising director he wants the newspaper "out of business."
http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2009/08/30/publisher-accuses-reid-bullying-nevada-newspaper/

GOPUSA

-- What's next. . .Obama to control your inbox? - Bobby Eberle (DIERSEN: Some Democrats and RINOs who read GOPUSA ILLINOIS emails for "opposition research" do not want to keep GOPUSA ILLINOIS emails out of your inbox. But nevertheless, many Democrats, RINOs, and "conservatives" who work against other conservatives do want to keep GOPUSA ILLINOIS emails out of you inbox.)
http://www.gopusa.com/theloft/?p=1885
(FROM THE COMMENTARY: CNET's translation? "If your company is deemed 'critical,' a new set of regulations kick in involving who you can hire, what information you must disclose, and when the government would exercise control over your computers or network." Here's the kicker. . .not only would this bill put more private industry under the supervision of the government, but once again, the government is showing that it has no grasp of what actually goes on in private industry. "The Rockefeller proposal plays out against a broader concern in Washington, D.C., about the government's role in cybersecurity. In May, President Obama acknowledged that the government is "not as prepared" as it should be to respond to disruptions and announced that a new cybersecurity coordinator position would be created inside the White House staff. Three months later, that post remains empty, one top cybersecurity aide has quit, and some wags have begun to wonder why a government that receives failing marks on cybersecurity should be trusted to instruct the private sector what to do." At the risk of stating the obvious, the government should stick to those specific functions outlined by the Constitution and stay out of private industry. Obama and his team continue to seize more control over our private lives, but with each passing day, they also show that they are ill-equipped to handle the situation. The last thing we need is more government control over the Internet and Obama telling cyber-professionals how to do their jobs. I don't want Obama patrolling my inbox with "professionals" licensed by his administration. Do you?)

ASSOCIATED PRESS

-- DIERSEN HEADLINE: Tragically, many of those who George W. Bush appointed rejected many planks in the Republican Party platform. Not surprisingly, Obama has reappointed many of them. http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5h_Cmb0nZ4cHr-etnWUOxXGrvmquAD9ADSBOO1

TTOWN300@aol.com
-- DIERSEN HEADLINE: TTOWN300@aol.com blasts Diersen, promotes Mark Kirk, blasts Martin: "You know what? You really are an idiot. Mark Kirk is not "left wing" Moderate maybe. . .but to call him "left wing" That shows a complete lack of education. Also, you continue to support the Nazi Andy Martin. Let the readers know who you support in the primary. You are always asking for everybody else to stand for something. IS ANDY MARTIN ANTI-SEMITIC? Come on Mr. Principle. . .take a stand. I bet you don't have the PRINCIPLE to do that. Are Mr. Martin's past statements anti-Semitic? If you say no. . .you are blind. I am a proud Republican and I really do respect your efforts. But you really do depress me with your lack of understanding sometimes.
TTOWN300@aol.com

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Sunday, August 30, 2009

Lou Lang Explains Income Tax Fight

In Part 1 and Part 2 of looking at State Rep. Lou Lang's view of what really happened in the spring session of the Illinois General Assembly, he talked about how not enough votes could be garnered from Democrats, but that there were sufficient Republicans willing to vote for a (50%, not mentioned by Lang) income tax hike had not Republican Leader Tom Cross intimidated them.

This article continues with the questioning of Democratic Party McHenry County Board member Paula Yensen at last Wednesday's meeting of the McHenry County Democratic Party Central Committee meeting.

"(I was) just trying to follow it in the newspaper and wonder why people could not be working together.

"The not-for-profits have made cuts for the last ten years. They're five months, seven months in arrears in getting (state payments). Financial institutions are not lending (so they) can make payroll. I don't think people fully understand."
"I think they do understand," Lang replied, "but when politics rules over common sense, you know where it's at.

"There are elected officials who don't give a dame. They're looking at November 2, 2010.

"When a person gets most of his money from business interests...it won't matter to that legislator.

"They'll say it matters, but it doesn't matter.

"Regular people can't believe this. People say,
'These people really care about us.
I heard them say it.'
"But they don't care.

"The not-for-profit community dropped the ball her," Lang explained, pointing out that they came to Springfield for demonstrations, but that was not enough.

"But, how many of those thousands of people went to see their own legislator in their own offices?

"None, very few."

Lang then explained, "The last time Illinois raised income taxes not one single legislator in either chamber or party lost his next election."

Land did allow that people remember Republican Governor Richard Ogilvie losing to Dan Walker in 1972 after Ogilvie signed the bill imposing the income tax.

"If you explain to (constituents) why your doing what you're doing, they will (support you).

"But when gutless wonders stroll the Capitol, (it won't happen)."

= = = = =
At the Wednesday meeting you see above, from left to right, you see Marti Swanson in the foreground, Ed Riley, who ran for Greenwood Township Supervisor, former District 6 McHenry County Board candidate Robert Ludwig, District 5 McHenry County Board member Paula Yensen, Ed Rotchford, Bob Kaempfe, candidate for state representative against Mike Tryon, Nunda Township Trustee candidate Meredith Reid Sarkees, District 5 McHenry County Board member Jim Kennedy and Mike Bisset.

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GOPUSA ILLINOIS Daily Clips - August 30, 2009

Articles of interest to Illinois Republicans recently posted by ABC7, NBC5, CBS2, Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times, Crain's Chicago Business, Daily Herald, Suburban Chicago News, Suburban Life, Pioneer Local, Southtown Star, Rockford Register Star, Bloomington Pantagraph, Peoria Journal Star, Springfield State Journal Register, Belleville News Democrat, Southern Illinoisan, Illinois Review, Public Affairs, Champion News, Illinois Family Institute, Americans For Truth, Chicago Daily Observer, Tom Roeser, Capitalfax, etc. Since January 1, 2005, GOPUSA ILLINOIS has brought 50,469 such articles and information on many upcoming events to its subscribers' attention each morning, free of charge, and without any advertising. To view the August 30, 2009 GOPUSA ILLINOIS Daily Clips, please visit www.gopillinois.com. Thanks

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Saturday, August 29, 2009

GOPUSA ILLINOIS Daily Clips - August 29, 2009

Articles of interest to Illinois Republicans recently posted by ABC7, NBC5, CBS2, Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times, Crain's Chicago Business, Daily Herald, Suburban Chicago News, Suburban Life, Pioneer Local, Southtown Star, Rockford Register Star, Bloomington Pantagraph, Peoria Journal Star, Springfield State Journal Register, Belleville News Democrat, Southern Illinoisan, Illinois Review, Public Affairs, Champion News, Illinois Family Institute, Americans For Truth, Chicago Daily Observer, Tom Roeser, Capitalfax, etc. Since January 1, 2005, GOPUSA ILLINOIS has brought 50,416 such articles and information on many upcoming events to its subscribers' attention each morning, free of charge, and without any advertising. To view the August 29, 2009 GOPUSA ILLINOIS Daily Clips, please visit www.gopillinois.com. Thanks

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Friday, August 28, 2009

GOPUSA ILLINOIS Daily Clips - August 28, 2009

Articles of interest to Illinois Republicans recently posted by ABC7, NBC5, CBS2, Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times, Crain's Chicago Business, Daily Herald, Suburban Chicago News, Suburban Life, Pioneer Local, Southtown Star, Rockford Register Star, Bloomington Pantagraph, Peoria Journal Star, Springfield State Journal Register, Belleville News Democrat, Southern Illinoisan, Illinois Review, Public Affairs, Champion News, Illinois Family Institute, Americans For Truth, Chicago Daily Observer, Tom Roeser, Capitalfax, etc. Since January 1, 2005, GOPUSA ILLINOIS has brought 50,370 such articles and information on many upcoming events to its subscribers' attention each morning, free of charge, and without any advertising. To view the August 28, 2009 GOPUSA ILLINOIS Daily Clips, please visit www.gopillinois.com. Thanks

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Thursday, August 27, 2009

Reform do-over

By Bethany Jaeger

In an unusual move, the Illinois legislative leaders asked the governor to veto a bill that Democratic members sent to his desk in May. Gov. Pat Quinn obliged, saying he would work with members of both political parties, as well as government reform advocates, to start from scratch — and get it done by October 14 — to tighten up the rules for the funding of political campaigns.

Quinn vetoed House Bill 7, which would have established contributions limits of $5,000 for individuals, $10,000 for businesses and labor unions and $90,000 for transfers from statewide political parties. Quinn said since he received the bill, he’s gotten a lot of feedback from individuals, reform advocates and newspaper editorials that the bill was flawed and could have unintended consequences, as well as risked turning voters away from a system that maintains the status quo. In turn, Illinois remains one of only a handful of states with no limits on the amount individuals, businesses or interest groups can donate to political candidates.

“I’d rather take more time to get it right and have public consensus behind it than hastily do something that might have happened in the spring,” Quinn said during a news conference with all four legislative leaders. They were joined by reform advocates from Change Illinois, a coalition of about 50 organizations seeking campaign contribution limits, among other things.

George Ranney, president and chief executive officer of Chicago Metropolis 2020, as well as a co-chair of the reform group Change Illinois, said the governor and the legislative leaders agreeing to work out a compromise before the General Assembly returns for its annual fall veto session was a “major step in the right direction.” Next, he said, “even more so, at this point, we think there is an opportunity to do the right thing for this state, to enact a bill that has strong limits, that has the right kind of committee structure and, importantly, has a real set of provisions for enforcement.”

It was "not perfect"
Quinn’s veto comes after he testified in favor of HB 7 in late May. Sitting next to House Speaker Michael Madigan, the governor said then that the bill was not perfect, but it was a “significant step forward” and that it was the “best we can do at this time.”

His testimony contradicted the recommendations of his own Illinois Reform Commission, which wanted more stringent contribution limits and other enforcement reforms.

Quinn said today that he seriously considered altering the bill or adding to it, which would have sent it back to the legislature. But he said it dawned on him that it was better to totally veto it and make a stronger bill. He added that he would seek the commission’s input on a new version. “Sometimes when you have to alter your course to make things better, you do that. I’d rather make it better than to not do it right.”

Senate President John Cullerton said in Quinn’s defense that a new negotiated bill wasn’t ready by the time Quinn had to act on HB 7 (he faced a Friday deadline). “We asked the governor to veto this bill. We asked him — the sponsors of the bill — asked him to veto it. Because if he signed it, there are people here who think it could be much better, and that would be interpreted as accepting something that had flaws. We didn’t want to do that,” Cullerton said. “He’s not flip- flopping. He’s doing what we’ve asked.”

Cullerton added that the general areas they intend to work on include the level of contribution limits and the ability of officials to enforce the new rules.

Cynthia Canary, who previously described HB 7 as “phony reform,” today defended Quinn. “We often slam our elected officials for not having a backbone, for not listening to us, for flip-flopping. What could be braver than listening to the people coming to the table and saying, ‘We hear you. We’re going to try to do things differently.’”

Republicans, who argued they were cut out of the negotiating process, deemed the bill “seriously flawed” and urged the governor to reject it in totality and start over. Senate Minority Leader Christine Radogno today commended Quinn for “courage” in not signing HB 7 just to have something on the books. “As desperate as our state is for reform, and that includes campaign finance reform, there was tremendous pressure on the governor to go ahead and enact a bill that really would have maintained the status quo or even made it worse.”

During the spring legislative session, Radogno sponsored multiple versions of campaign finance limits. One version matched recommendations by the Illinois Reform Commission and Change Illinois. It would have established contribution limits similar to those set at the federal level: $2,400 for individuals, $5,000 for political committees, businesses and unions, and $30,000 for legislative leadership. Her new bill eventually will appear in Senate Bill 2464 (the link won't be available for a while).

House Republicans also supported a Democratic-sponsored bill, HB 24, that would have mirrored federal limits.

House Minority Leader Tom Cross said today that agreeing to start over on campaign finance was a good beginning, but there’s more on the agenda. He said Republicans also want to address the idea of moving back the primary election date (now held in early February), allowing voters to recall elected officials, instituting special elections to fill vacant seats and reforming the redistricting process.

House Bill 7, as approved
HB 7 as approved by the Illinois General Assembly would not have taken effect until January 2011, after the next general election.

One point of contention among reform groups and legislators is that the bill set a pseudo limit on statewide political party transfers. While the dollar amount of transfers would be limited, the Democratic Party of Illinois, for instance, could offer unlimited in-kind contributions. That could include anything from support for advertisements, yard signs, mailers to manpower to knock on doors.

Anther debated provision would create a new type of fund for legislators to pay for maintaining their offices and assisting people in their legislative districts. Contributions to those funds would be capped at $5,000. The money could not be used for campaigns. Critics said the new so-called “constituent services” funds could be used as a loophole for politicians to throw political events.

And contrary to the wishes of the governor’s reform commission, HB 7 as approved would have only required real-time disclosure during the month of May, when state budget negotiations tend to peak. Other than that, political campaigns would have to file financial reports four times a year. The Illinois Reform Commission wanted politicians to immediately report contributions throughout the entire year. They currently only have to file major disclosure reports twice a year. The bill does include a provision to allow the Illinois State Board of Elections to audit candidates and committees if they missed two consecutive reporting deadlines.

House and Senate Republicans issued the following list of “flaws,” in addition to the points made above:

  • “Limits are based on an annual cycle, not election cycles” — Annual cycles could benefit incumbents who could raise money year-round, while challengers would struggle to gain name recognition and financial support.
  • “Too many possibilities for candidate committees” — It could spur the creation of even more political finance committees because each official and candidate would be able to have up to three separate committees, all with different contribution limits. House Minority Leader Tom Cross said that would cause a “diffusion of contributions, not a limitation on them.”
  • “No comprehensive enforcement mechanism” — The Illinois State Board of Elections would gain little power and financial support to enforce the new rules, although it would be able to audit campaigns if they missed two consecutive reporting deadlines.
  • “Doesn’t take effect until 2011” — That’s after the next general elections, which House Speaker Michael Madigan has said would make it fairer because candidates who started fundraising under the old rules would have an advantage over those who started under the new ones.


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GOPUSA ILLINOIS Daily Clips - August 27, 2009

Articles of interest to Illinois Republicans recently posted by ABC7, NBC5, CBS2, Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times, Crain's Chicago Business, Daily Herald, Suburban Chicago News, Suburban Life, Pioneer Local, Southtown Star, Rockford Register Star, Bloomington Pantagraph, Peoria Journal Star, Springfield State Journal Register, Belleville News Democrat, Southern Illinoisan, Illinois Review, Public Affairs, Champion News, Illinois Family Institute, Americans For Truth, Chicago Daily Observer, Tom Roeser, Capitalfax, etc. Since January 1, 2005, GOPUSA ILLINOIS has brought 50,317 such articles and information on many upcoming events to its subscribers' attention each morning, free of charge, and without any advertising. To view the August 27, 2009 GOPUSA ILLINOIS Daily Clips, please visit www.gopillinois.com. Thanks

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After Hours Use of Jack Franks' Office Scheduled for Health Care Lobbying

by Cal Skinner

One of the friends of McHenry County Blog has discovered that Democratic Party State Rep. Jack Franks' Woodstock office is going to be used Tuesday, September 1st, to lobby citizens for President Barack Obama's health care reform plan. The "host" is Lawrence Glowacki, as you can see from the bottom image.

Here's what the Organizing for America web page says:

The Details

McHenry County: Phone Bank for Health Care (Health Care Phonebank)

HcHenry and Northern Kane county OFA, HCAN and NW Suburbs for Obama will be hosting a phone bank for health care reform at the offices of State Representative Jack Franks in Woodstock. Our objectives are to mobilize supporters, while reaching out to the undecided to answer their questions. Please join us at this very pivotal time, to advocate for health care reform in our country.

Phone bank training will be provided for first-timers.
Bring your cell phones.

So far, one person has signed up.

You can click to enlarge the images.

Meanwhile, the sign in front of Franks office says,

OUT KIDS ARE
BACK IN SCHOOL
DRIVE SAFELY
Posted first on McHenry County Blog, where there is more information about local Democratic Party activities here and here.

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Wednesday, August 26, 2009

Two UI trustees remain

By Bethany Jaeger
Two University of Illinois trustees who refuse to resign after the exposure of an admissions scandal will remain. Gov. Pat Quinn said today he wanted to avoid potentially lengthy litigation that would distract from the new board’s mission.

“Indeed, I feel that if we went down that road, that would become the main show, as opposed to what we really have to do,” Quinn said during a Chicago news conference. “Our main focus should be on repairing the damage that ‘s been caused to the university.”

The Chicago Tribune reported in early June that over five years, about 800 students received special treatment and were admitted to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign because they were sponsored by such politically connected officials as former Gov. Rod Blagojevich, legislators and university donors and trustees.

Quinn sought the voluntary resignations of all nine appointed trustees, as recommended by a special panel led by former federal Judge Abner Mikva. Two board members resigned before the report came out. Five resigned after. Two did not step down. They are Democrats Carroll Frances and James Montgomery. Quinn said he met with Frances and Montgomery and reiterated his stance that they had a fiduciary responsibility and that “if something goes wrong on your watch, seriously wrong, then you should voluntarily file your resignation.”

However, he said, it’s their choice to serve the remainder of their terms. Frances’ term ends January 2011, while Montgomery’s term is supposed to end in 2013.

“I am not going to seek to remove them,” Quinn said. “I think the litigation that would ensue if I did that would totally distract us from our mission at hand, which is rebuilding the public confidence in the integrity of the University of Illinois. That would be a sideshow.

He later added, “I think it’s much better to just soldier on with good men and women that I appoint.”

As of today, Quinn has filled two vacancies and said he would fill the remaining five before the board’s next meeting September 10.

Today, he appointed Christopher Kennedy, president of Merchandise Mart Properties based in Chicago and son of the late U.S. Sen. Robert F. and Ethel Kennedy (as well as nephew of the late U.S. Sen. Ted Kennedy). Chris Kennedy’s name was floated as a possible U.S. Senate candidate to fill the seat vacated by President Barack Obama and was mentioned as a potential candidate for governor. He opted not to run in either race.

“He’s a person of great accomplishment,” Quinn said. “He understands business, and he definitely believes in social service. He believes in education.”

Quinn also appointed Lawrence Oliver II of Orland Park. He has been a chief legal counsel for the Boeing Company since 2004. Previously, he was a private attorney and an assistant U.S. state’s attorney in Chicago, as well as a member of Quinn’s Illinois Reform Commission and a vice chairman of the state’s Executive Ethics Commission.

“He is a person who understands the law, and he definitely understands ethics,” Quinn said.

They replace Democrat Niranjan Shah, whose term was set to expire in 2015, and Lawrence Eppley, who lists his political affiliation as "independent" and whose term was to expire in 2013.

Of the 10 voting members, no more than five can be from the same political party. The trustees are charged with governing the University of Illinois, including all three branches in Chicago, Urbana-Champaign and Springfield.

Quinn, who is an ex officio member, said it’s up to the new trustees to decide how to reform the admissions process and whether to take action against the high-level administrators who were involved in the so-called Category I scandal.

Senate President John Cullerton is still encouraging the remaining trustees to step down, according to Rikeesha Phelon, his spokeswoman. “Since that is not likely to happen, he is reminding them that if Senate Bill 1333 passes the Senate, it will have the effect of removing the remaining trustees by law.”

The legislation was advanced as a way to force Quinn to “fumigate” state government from up to 750 employees or appointees put in place by then-Gov. Rod Blagojevich. The measure stalled during the spring legislative session. Cullerton is expected to call that legislation for a vote when the General Assembly convenes for its fall “veto” session in October.

Comptroller Dan Hynes, who is a Democratic opponent against Quinn in the February primary election, sent a statement through his campaign that said Quinn mishandled the situation from the beginning. “Yesterday, Gov. Quinn said he would act on the University of Illinois trustees issue with ‘certainty and with dispatch.’ Today he did neither. Unfortunately there is little that is certain about the ultimate resolution of a scandal first revealed last May, and acting with dispatch would have resolved this matter well before the students returned to class.”

Hynes did not say whether he would have forced the resignation of the remaining two trustees. A call to his campaign was not immediately returned.

Ann Lousin, a John Marshall Law School professor who helped draft the 1970 state Constitution and who is a former chair of the Illinois State Civil Service Commission, points to the constitutional provision spelling out the governor’s ability to remove appointees. It states that the governor can remove an appointee for “incompetence, neglect of duty, or malfeasance in office.”

She said that provision — while arguable both ways — would not apply to gubernatorial appointees of the University of Illinois board of trustees. “Because then that would make the University of Illinois nothing more than a state agency under control of the governor and required to do his bidding.”

“If you want an independent board on the University of Illinois,” she added, “you do not allow the governor to get rid of them when they don’t part their hair right.”

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GOPUSA ILLINOIS Daily Clips - August 26, 2009

Articles of interest to Illinois Republicans recently posted by ABC7, NBC5, CBS2, Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times, Crain's Chicago Business, Daily Herald, Suburban Chicago News, Suburban Life, Pioneer Local, Southtown Star, Rockford Register Star, Bloomington Pantagraph, Peoria Journal Star, Springfield State Journal Register, Belleville News Democrat, Southern Illinoisan, Illinois Review, Public Affairs, Champion News, Illinois Family Institute, Americans For Truth, Chicago Daily Observer, Tom Roeser, Capitalfax, etc. Since January 1, 2005, GOPUSA ILLINOIS has brought 50,268 such articles and information on many upcoming events to its subscribers' attention each morning, free of charge, and without any advertising. To view the August 26, 2009 GOPUSA ILLINOIS Daily Clips, please visit www.gopillinois.com. Thanks

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Tuesday, August 25, 2009

Home services grant to be cut October 1

By Bethany Jaeger
A short-term borrowing plan approved by the General Assembly to prevent drastic cuts to human services might not be enough to prevent layoffs of workers who advocate for people with disabilities throughout the state.

A network of about two-dozen Centers for Independent Living were told earlier this month that starting October 1, a state grant that pays for recruiting and training personal assistants for individuals with severe disabilities would be cut. The so-called Home Services grant is funded through the Illinois Department of Human Services. It also pays for training of the people with the disabilities so they understand their civil rights when working with caseworkers and so they learn ways to manage their personal assistants.


The 23 Centers for Independent Living that operate throughout the state run on shoestring budgets, said Ann Ford, executive director of the Illinois Network of Centers for Independent Living based in Springfield. They already anticipated a 10 percent reduction in funding as part of the fiscal year 2010 budget agreement, which is expected to result in furlough days and potential layoffs. Cutting the Home Services grant on top of that would affect between 2,500 and 3,000 individuals who are served under the program each year, according to Ford.

For Mark Karner, director of advocacy for Progress Center for Independent Living in Forest Park, that means he’s out of a job Thursday. Karner also has multiple disabilities and needs a machine to help him breathe and a home aide to help him get out of bed each morning, among other daily functions. He expects to be on a job hunt, or, if he couldn’t find a flexible employer, then he would have to file for unemployment or Social Security, which he has not had since before he started working at Progress Center 16 years ago.

Tom Green, spokesman for the Department of Human Services, said it all comes down to the budget. “It’s the toughest financial challenge that Illinois has ever had. Everyone has to make sacrifices. There’s a limited amount of revenue in the budget that was passed by the General Assembly, not enough to cover all the expenses. And DHS has made cuts in all budget areas.”

He added that cuts to community-based services would have been far deeper, as much as 50 percent, without a $3.4 billion borrowing plan approved by the General Assembly in July. About $2.2 billion of that was slated for community-based human services. But that same budget agreement also relies on Quinn reducing another $1 billion in spending. The General Assembly gave Quinn unprecedented discretion in where to cut.

Ford said she was “very disappointed” in that budget agreement.

“We continue to borrow. We don’t really act like adults and look at what do we need to do to have enough revenue in this state to support the programs that allow some people some dignity in their lives,” she said. “It’s a huge disappointment to me that that was the option that was chosen, and it’s a bigger disappointment to me that the General Assembly then went home and said to the governor, ‘Do whatever you want to do.’”

On July 31, Quinn said that he would spread the cuts out in a way that would maximize federal matching and stimulus funds. And he said he would fund health-related initiatives that focus on disease prevention and that reduce demand for more expensive services later.

Karner said zeroing out the Human Services grant would do the opposite. Mike Ervin, for instance, needs the personal assistants. But he’s lived in his own condominium in Chicago as a freelance writer, a playwright and a community activist, and he’s not enrolled in Medicaid. Losing the personal assistants grant program, Ervin said, would take the system back 30 years. “Not only does it keep me out of nursing homes, but I employ five people. And it keeps us paying whatever taxes we do. It’s just positive all the way around. It’s the wave of the future, it’s the way the future should be going. And cutting it just such a huge regression.”

Karner said a meeting for consumers affected by the Home Services grant is scheduled in Chicago Friday. “I guess there’s still some glimmer of hope that the governor will change his mind before October 1,” he said.

Rallies against the cuts also are scheduled next Monday in Springfield and Chicago. Ford said if the centers don’t know by mid-September whether the grant will be restored, more layoffs are expected.

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GOPUSA ILLINOIS Daily Clips - August 25, 2009

Articles of interest to Illinois Republicans recently posted by ABC7, NBC5, CBS2, Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times, Crain's Chicago Business, Daily Herald, Suburban Chicago News, Suburban Life, Pioneer Local, Southtown Star, Rockford Register Star, Bloomington Pantagraph, Peoria Journal Star, Springfield State Journal Register, Belleville News Democrat, Southern Illinoisan, Illinois Review, Public Affairs, Champion News, Illinois Family Institute, Americans For Truth, Chicago Daily Observer, Tom Roeser, Capitalfax, etc. Since January 1, 2005, GOPUSA ILLINOIS has brought 50,207 such articles and information on many upcoming events to its subscribers' attention each morning, free of charge, and without any advertising. To view the August 25, 2009 GOPUSA ILLINOIS Daily Clips, please visit www.gopillinois.com. Thanks

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Monday, August 24, 2009

GOPUSA ILLINOIS Daily Clips - August 24, 2009

Articles of interest to Illinois Republicans recently posted by ABC7, NBC5, CBS2, Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times, Crain's Chicago Business, Daily Herald, Suburban Chicago News, Suburban Life, Pioneer Local, Southtown Star, Rockford Register Star, Bloomington Pantagraph, Peoria Journal Star, Springfield State Journal Register, Belleville News Democrat, Southern Illinoisan, Illinois Review, Public Affairs, Champion News, Illinois Family Institute, Americans For Truth, Chicago Daily Observer, Tom Roeser, Capitalfax, etc. Since January 1, 2005, GOPUSA ILLINOIS has brought 50,173 such articles and information on many upcoming events to its subscribers' attention each morning, free of charge, and without any advertising. To view the August 24, 2009 GOPUSA ILLINOIS Daily Clips, please visit http://www.gopillinois.com/. Thanks

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Sunday, August 23, 2009

Dan Hynes' Supporters Prospect in Jack Franks' Back Yard

by Cal Skinner

Imagine my surprise to be on the receiving end of a fund raising pitch for State Comptroller Dan Hynes' gubernatorial campaign.

I don't mean because I'm a Republican precinct committeeman.

I mean because it came from one of Jack Frank's heavy hitting McHenry County constituents.

My understanding is that it being distributed to active McHenry County Democrats.

The solicitation in question is for a Wednesday, August 26th, event at the River East Art Center, starting at 5 o'clock for the heavy hitters, 5:30 for ordinary mortals who can ante up $250.

It might be a signal for the state representative with the big campaign fund to announce what intentions he has for next year.

Having one's gubernatorial ambition mentioned once in a while after being repeatedly ignored is not enough to win a contested statewide primary election against appointed Governor Pat Quinn and Hynes.

Posted first on McHenry County Blog.

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GOPUSA ILLINOIS Daily Clips - August 23, 2009

Articles of interest to Illinois Republicans recently posted by ABC7, NBC5, CBS2, Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times, Crain's Chicago Business, Daily Herald, Suburban Chicago News, Suburban Life, Pioneer Local, Southtown Star, Rockford Register Star, Bloomington Pantagraph, Peoria Journal Star, Springfield State Journal Register, Belleville News Democrat, Southern Illinoisan, Illinois Review, Public Affairs, Champion News, Illinois Family Institute, Americans For Truth, Chicago Daily Observer, Tom Roeser, Capitalfax, etc. Since January 1, 2005, GOPUSA ILLINOIS has brought 50,133 such articles and information on many upcoming events to its subscribers' attention each morning, free of charge, and without any advertising. To view the August 23, 2009 GOPUSA ILLINOIS Daily Clips, please visit www.gopillinois.com. Thanks

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Saturday, August 22, 2009

GOPUSA ILLINOIS Daily Clips - August 22, 2009

Articles of interest to Illinois Republicans recently posted by ABC7, NBC5, CBS2, Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times, Crain's Chicago Business, Daily Herald, Suburban Chicago News, Suburban Life, Pioneer Local, Southtown Star, Rockford Register Star, Bloomington Pantagraph, Peoria Journal Star, Springfield State Journal Register, Belleville News Democrat, Southern Illinoisan, Illinois Review, Public Affairs, Champion News, Illinois Family Institute, Americans For Truth, Chicago Daily Observer, Tom Roeser, Capitalfax, etc. Since January 1, 2005, GOPUSA ILLINOIS has brought 50,101 such articles and information on many upcoming events to its subscribers' attention each morning, free of charge, and without any advertising. To view the August 22, 2009 GOPUSA ILLINOIS Daily Clips, please visit www.gopillinois.com. Thanks

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Friday, August 21, 2009

Republican transition

By Bethany Jaeger
As a handful of Republicans toss their hats into the ring for Illinois governor, their party’s ringleader of sorts surprised top GOP officials by stepping down Thursday during a meeting in Springfield.

Andy McKenna, chairman of the Illinois Republican Party since 2005, told state central committee members he was resigning to allow the party to transition before the February 2 primary elections, rather than waiting until his term was supposed to end. “I don’t to want distract you [during] the general election race,” he said.


The State Central Committee elected Pat Brady, a national committeeman, to fill out the rest of McKenna’s term. Members will elect a new chairperson after the primary election.

Countering some speculation, McKenna did not announce a bid for another race. He previously expressed interest in a bid for the U.S. Senate seat formerly held by President Barack Obama. His actions sparked controversy within the party, as Republican U.S. Rep. Mark Kirk, a five-term representative from Hinsdale, has announced in that race and is considered the front runner in the four-way contest.

McKenna instead told state central committee members that he would focus on building resources and getting involved in primary contests as chair of a “victory fund,” which he created to support Illinois’ GOP candidates.

The timing of McKenna’s resignation surprised party leaders, but Senate Minority Leader Christine Radogno said: “There’s been speculation for a while that a change might be coming. I don’t think anyone knew it was going to happen today or in this particular venue.”

She added, however, that the timing did help to avoid a distraction leading up to November 2010. “I think that it’s important that we get this chapter closed and settled and we have a new person at the helm the minute the primary’s over so that we can focus on the Democrats and not on the internal politics.”

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HB 7 in Detail: Independent Expenditures

Cross-posted from ICPR's blog, The Race is On:

Today we resume our series on the problems with HB 7, beyond the astronomical dollar limits. Recent posts have dealt with the effective date, calendar year limits, and the penalties for violating the law, among others.

Independent expenditures are so common in federal elections that they are routinely referred to by the initials "IE." These IE campaigns spring up in part because federal law limits how much anybody can give to a candidate, so that groups that want to spend more in support or opposition to a candidate have to work outside of that candidate's campaign. And there are explicit disclosure and contribution limit rules for IE efforts in federal law.

It makes sense for Illinois to adopt rules for IE campaigns at the same time that we adopt limits on campaign contributions generally. But while HB 7 has a section on "independent expenditures," it uses the term in very different ways than federal law does. These differences threaten the effectiveness and legality of the bill.

While federal law applies to any organization, the provision in HB 7 dealing with independent expenditures applies only to those "made by a natural person," meaning single individuals acting alone. The immediate consequence of this is to suggest that no other entity can engage in "independent expenditures," and the consequences of that would be vast. It would turn the contribution limits into spending limits, for one, which would certainly draw a skeptical judicial eye in the inevitable challenge (note that the bill exempts parties and some other committees from this limit).

There are also apparent drafting problems in this section. The section ensures a modicum of disclosure from natural persons acting independently of any political committee. Individuals are required to report when they have spent $3,000 and again at $20,000. It is not clear that the bill would require any continuing obligation to report -- say, at increments of $20,000. Nor is it clear that the person would have any obligation to disclose at the time that they commit to making an expenditure. If they have to disclose only when they actually pay the bills, that disclosure may well come well after the ads have run, and long after Election Day.

To the extent that HB 7 tried to ensure that individuals making large expenditures in relation to candidates are covered by disclosure requirements, the bill is on a useful errand. But the section is drafted in ways that fall short of that goal and threaten the abilities of others to make their voices heard in the course of campaigns. It needs to be re-written.

To comment, please visit ICPR's blog.

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GOPUSA ILLINOIS Daily Clips - August 21, 2009

Articles of interest to Illinois Republicans recently posted by ABC7, NBC5, CBS2, Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times, Crain's Chicago Business, Daily Herald, Suburban Chicago News, Suburban Life, Pioneer Local, Southtown Star, Rockford Register Star, Bloomington Pantagraph, Peoria Journal Star, Springfield State Journal Register, Belleville News Democrat, Southern Illinoisan, Illinois Review, Public Affairs, Champion News, Illinois Family Institute, Americans For Truth, Chicago Daily Observer, Tom Roeser, Capitalfax, etc. Since January 1, 2005, GOPUSA ILLINOIS has brought 50,069 such articles and information on many upcoming events to its subscribers' attention each morning, free of charge, and without any advertising. To view the August 21, 2009 GOPUSA ILLINOIS Daily Clips, please visit www.gopillinois.com. Thanks

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Thursday, August 20, 2009

GOPUSA ILLINOIS Daily Clips - August 20, 2009

Articles of interest to Illinois Republicans recently posted by ABC7, NBC5, CBS2, Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times, Crain's Chicago Business, Daily Herald, Suburban Chicago News, Suburban Life, Pioneer Local, Southtown Star, Rockford Register Star, Bloomington Pantagraph, Peoria Journal Star, Springfield State Journal Register, Belleville News Democrat, Southern Illinoisan, Illinois Review, Public Affairs, Champion News, Illinois Family Institute, Americans For Truth, Chicago Daily Observer, Tom Roeser, Capitalfax, etc. Since January 1, 2005, GOPUSA ILLINOIS has brought 50,013 such articles and information on many upcoming events to its subscribers' attention each morning, free of charge, and without any advertising. To view the August 20, 2009 GOPUSA ILLINOIS Daily Clips, please visit www.gopillinois.com. Thanks

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Wednesday, August 19, 2009

Governor's Day highlights 2010 primary

By Bethany Jaeger
Democrats got a preview Wednesday of what to expect leading up to the February 2 primary election: a partial-term governor who says an income tax increase is necessary to maintain essential state services versus a state comptroller who says citizens shouldn’t have a governor by default. They should have a choice.

Comptroller Dan Hynes stood a few feet away from Gov. Pat Quinn this morning when he said Illinois needs a governor who leads with “no sugarcoating, no short-cuts, no excuses.”

“We need a governor who can provide strong and steady leadership for smart budget policies that will put us on solid financial ground, and we will need a leader who will offer a clear, consistent and compelling vision for our future,” Hynes said. “That’s what this election is about.”

He spoke to a packed banquet hall during an annual breakfast of the Illinois Democratic County Chairmen’s Association in Springfield. Many Illinois elected officials typically attend the event before the annual State Fair rally day for Democrats.

Hynes continued to say that the Democratic Party has been through too much to take the path of least resistance. “The people of Illinois have been through too much to avoid asking tough questions and facing a public debate about which vision our party will embrace. I respect Pat Quinn. I find him to be a decent man, but this nomination must be earned, not bequeathed or signed or transferred. It must be earned.”

A few moments later, Quinn in his speech countered that on March 18, he proposed a budget that would raise the state income tax as a way to balance a severely out-of-whack budget and help recover from the aftermath of a nationwide recession. “Talk about courage. Talk about not sugarcoating our budget deficit. We have to tell the truth to the people of Illinois.”

Throughout his speech, Quinn thanked all statewide officers except Hynes. He even thanked local politicians, including Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart. The governor later said he would defend his record against Hynes’ statements, particularly since the comptroller has not endorsed the idea of an income tax increase. “He can stand on the sidelines and throw bricks at the guy in the middle of the arena, but I think part of the job of governor is not to be a shrinking violet, to take positions and to defend those positions and tell the people what they need to know,” Quinn said.

Hynes chose not to attend a Democratic rally at the State Fairgrounds later in the day because, he said, Quinn deserved to host of the annual Governor’s Day, a State Fair tradition. I ran into Hynes after the rally, when he said his budget plan would start with spending cuts, then find new revenues. "We have to eliminate wasteful spending and show the people that we’re doing everything we can to sacrifice and streamline before we ask them to pay more. And that hasn’t yet happened. Gov. Quinn has really been unwilling to do those tough things.”

As part of the budget agreement with the state legislature, Quinn already has cut $1 billion in spending and is charged with reducing another $1 billion before the end of the fiscal year. Among many other spending decreases, Quinn seeks furlough days and layoffs for state employees. But some of those plans require negotiations with public employee unions, who strongly oppose both ideas and instead say an income tax increase is necessary.

Governor’s Day at the State Fair
The Democratic rally completely differed from the past six years. The absence of former Gov. Rod Blagojevich, as well as busloads of union supporters that Blagojevich’s campaign brought in, made a difference. For the first time, the House speaker, the Senate president and the governor sat next to each other. Even Attorney General Lisa Madigan joined the rally, which she has not attended in a few years.

There was little drama, other than jokes made about six of at least eight candidates for lieutenant governor sitting on the stage together and addressing the crowd one by one.

Democratic leaders acknowledged that their political party faces many challenges, particularly the ethical lapses and fiscal woes exposed within the last year, but they tried to frame Blagojevich’s impeachment as a result of their proactive steps.

“As we face a challenge of ethics and integrity, it was the Democrats in the Illinois House of Representatives that initiated the impeachment proceeding against their own Democratic governor,” said House Speaker Michael Madigan. “We’re not happy with what happened, but when the time came, we were more than capable to make a decision that one of our own had done wrong and must be removed from office.”

Republicans will try not to let them get away with that, however. Senate Minority Leader Christine Radogno, whom I stood next to in the Statehouse basement during a tornado warning, countered the Democratic message. “They can try as hard as they want, but the people of this state are smarter than that. And the fact of the matter is, people need to remember, the Democrat legislature enabled Blagojevich from Day 1. So it’s difficult for them just to walk away now.” Madigan also co-chaired Blagojevich’s reelection campaign, she added.

Republicans will have their rally day at the State Fair on Thursday.

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"Bean is a coward, plain and simple."

That's what Marathon Pundit John Ruberry concluded after he learned that tonight 8th District Democratic Party Congresswoman Melissa Bean is holding a telephone town meeting.

Ruberry just happened to be listening to Mancow Muller's WLS-AM show and heard about the telephone town meeting.

He wrote this story, from which the sentence I have used for a headline has been extracted.

When Ruberry tried to sign up, he was told he couldn't.

Only those folks who had participated in past telephone town hall meetings were allowed to participate.

There is an "in person" opportunity to hear Bean this month...if you have $25 and belong to one of the chambers of commerce which are sponsoring it.

Don't you love how representatives of the "Party of the People" treat the people?

Posted first on McHenry County Blog.

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GOPUSA ILLINOIS Daily Clips - August 19, 2009

Articles of interest to Illinois Republicans recently posted by ABC7, NBC5, CBS2, Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times, Crain's Chicago Business, Daily Herald, Suburban Chicago News, Suburban Life, Pioneer Local, Southtown Star, Rockford Register Star, Bloomington Pantagraph, Peoria Journal Star, Springfield State Journal Register, Belleville News Democrat, Southern Illinoisan, Illinois Review, Public Affairs, Champion News, Illinois Family Institute, Americans For Truth, Chicago Daily Observer, Tom Roeser, Capitalfax, etc. Since January 1, 2005, GOPUSA ILLINOIS has brought 49,960 such articles and information on many upcoming events to its subscribers' attention each morning, free of charge, and without any advertising. To view the August 19, 2009 GOPUSA ILLINOIS Daily Clips, please visit www.gopillinois.com. Thanks

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Tuesday, August 18, 2009

Revamped employee ethics rules enacted

By Bethany Jaeger
In a “week of reform,” Gov. Pat Quinn today signed Senate Bill 54, which addresses state employee ethics rules and lobbyist registration requirements. The governor enacted a revamped Freedom of Information Act yesterday.

Here’s the breakdown of SB 54 and some background, including why provisions to strengthen the role of inspectors general were needed (it relates to when former Gov. Rod Blagojevich formed the inspectors general but did not give them the ability to shine a light on ethics violations).

Employee ethics:

  • Reports written by inspectors general will be made public record if the inspectors find wrongdoing and either suspend or terminate a state employee. Some information could still be blacked out, or redacted, if its release would harm an ongoing investigation.
  • However, routine reports about the status of investigations will not be subject to requests under the Freedom of Information Act.
  • Inspectors will be able to open investigations based on anonymous tips.
  • The law clarifies the process for investigating potential ethics violations.
  • The Executive Ethics Commission will house new procurement officers to oversee the way state agencies buy goods and services.
  • Employees and candidates cannot promise compensated time off, benefits, raises, job promotions, favorable regulatory treatment or a state contract in exchange for a campaign contribution.
  • State employees have to take an online ethics exam within 30 days of starting their new jobs, rather than within six months, as currently required.

Updated revolving door ban:
  • Policymakers will not be able to resign and within a year accept a position with private companies that received significant state contracts from the agencies where the officials worked.
  • The state is expected to have an easier time tracking which employees will be subject to the revolving door ban because the legislation also requires agencies and executive offices to list those employees. Those lists will be filed with the agencies' respective ethics commissions.

New lobbying rules:
  • People who lobby state boards, commissions or retirement boards now will have to register as lobbyists.
  • All lobbyists will have to abide by stricter disclosure requirements, including listing all expenditures related to lobbying activities, their clients and the subject matter of lobbying activities. The reports will have to be filed with the secretary of state on a weekly basis when the legislature is in session and monthly during the off-season.
  • Many will have to pay a higher $1,000 fee, which is the way the state is expected to pay for more inspectors to monitor lobbying activities. House Speaker Michael Madigan previously said he would consider lowering the fee for smaller nonprofit groups in the future.

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Chris Kennedy Decides to Stay "Underground;" How about Jack Franks?

by Cal Skinner

Michael Sneed reports that Merchandise Mart honcho Chris Kennedy is "underground" concerning his candidacy for whatever.

He is so underground that he refuses to talk to WBBM-TV political reporter Mike Flannery. Flannery expressed his distaste (or, maybe, it was jealousy) when he appeared on WTTW's "Week in Review" recently.

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The Sun-Times is reporting that Kennedy is running for nothing.
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Also among the missing as far as political ambitions go is McHenry County's Democratic Party State Representative Jack Franks.

Franks floated the notion that he was considering running for governor in the Northwest Herald, but the "great mentioner" hasn't been mentioning Franks' name since State Comptroller Dan Hynes made it clear that he would challenge appointed Governor Pat Quinn in the Democratic Party primary election.

No word from him since he returned from a family fishing trip in northern Ontario.

Except a letter opposing McHenry County's permitting slot machines. He sent it to McHenry County Board Chairman Ken Koehler, a known gambling proponent.

Such a letter was obviously aimed at the conservative voters in his western and northern McHenry County district.

A sizable number picketed him and State Rep. Mark Beaubien (R-Barrington Hills) about co-sponsoring House Bill 2354 in front of Franks' office on a blistering March, 2009, Saturday. Both state representatives retreated.

My guess Franks will be unwilling to roll the dice for higher office in what is shaping up to be a Republican election year.

In spite of massive contributions from his family.

All that name identification and no where to go but the ice cream social at the Wonder Lake Water Ski Show.

Oops. That was when he was in Canada, wasn't it?

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The Wonder Lake Water Ski Show picture is from 2008.

Posted first at McHenry County Blog.

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